What is a Natural Fiber?

Last week we talked about synthetic fibers. We dove into the how they basically take plastic pellets and make them into material that then goes into your wipes, your pads, and other things that you wouldn’t think have any plastic in them. Today, we’re going to talk about natural fibers and why your body likes them much better.rsz_natural_fiber

A natural fiber will always come from a plant, animal, or mineral source. Cotton is an example of a plant sourced natural fiber, wool is an example of a natural fiber that comes from an animal, and asbestos is a mineral. Humans have been using natural fibers since civilization began to form, but in modern clothing, feminine hygiene, and beauty products, you’d be hard pressed to find any natural fiber. It’s worth it to take the time to find products containing 100% cotton though.

Want to know why?

  1. Cotton is Less Toxic

You already pay attention to the ingredients

What is a Synthetic Fiber?

Everyone knows about the fiber you need to be incorporating in your diet, but did you know there are other kinds of fiber that can have an impact on your health?

Fibers are a part of your everyday life, comprising many of the materials that you touch everyday, but not all fibers are created equally. By definition, a fiber is a substance that is longer than it is wider, but when you combine these small substances, you get a variety of useful products.

There are two main types of fibers that you need to be aware of:

-Synthetic Fibers

-Natural Fibers

Today we’re going to talk about synthetic fibers, how they’re made, and how you’re probably using them on a daily basis to care for some of the most sensitive parts of your body.

A synthetic fiber is a man-made fiber derived from oil-based products like plastic. Companies like ExxonMobil, BP, and

Is Your Top Sheet Telling the Truth?

In many feminine pad commercials, the main emphasis is always on the absorbent core, but there are other parts of the pad that deserve your attention. While a leak-free day is important, the outermost layer of the pad, also known as a top sheet, is touching one of the most sensitive parts of your body. Have you ever thought about what it’s made out of?

The truth is that many products you find on the shelf contain a top sheet constructed out of synthetic fibers. But just what is a synthetic fiber? In short, it’s a man-made textile developed using chemicals. What starts as plastic pellets is eventually broken down into thin strands and woven together to form the top sheet of your pad. While natural fibers like cotton inherently conduct moisture, synthetic fibers are oil-based and tend to trap moisture against the body. Goodbye, freshness!

An Aging Population Deserves Quality Cotton

old-person

In a report released by Persistent Market Research today, consumer demand for disposable medical supplies is expected to rise significantly by 2020. But just what are disposable medical supplies? Every time you go to the doctor or the dentist, certain products are used to conduct whatever tests you might need that day. A q-tip for a saliva sample, a dressing for a wound, and blood glucose test strips are all examples of disposable medical supplies. Other items include adult incontinence diapers and even the cotton balls used to wipe down your arm before you’re given a shot.

One of the reasons for the particularly high growth in this field is the aging Baby Boomer population. As more Americans enter their golden age, visits to the doctor increase, which places a higher demand on the products that are used the most. Did you know that Barnhardt’s Purified Cotton ™ is also placed in many health care products? Due to it’s

Why Buy American Cotton?

The idea of “buying local” is no longer a trend. Consumers of all demographics realize the importance of supporting local businesses and the advantages it can have, especially when it comes to your diet. Slowly but surely, this idea is creeping into other forms of businesses, but let’s face it; Everything you need isn’t made in your hometown. At that point, it’s advantageous to look for American-made products and products made with Purified Cotton™ fit the label to a tee. Here are two BIG reasons you should consider buying cotton grown in the good ol’ US of A.

american-grown

 

American Grown Cotton is Sustainable

Every product in your home (and even its various pieces) must go through what is called a “supply chain.” According to Investopedia, “a supply chain is a network between a company and its suppliers to produce and distribute a

10 Thoughts Every Woman Has on Her Period

Whether you’ve got your flow down to a science or it manages to sneak up on you each month, there are many thoughts that rattle through your brain from beginning to end. Of course every woman’s period and side effects are different. Some of us veg out, others exercise the cramps away, but you can guarantee that at least one of these thoughts has gone through your head while period-ing.

Why am I crying?”

Even though you know that commercial with the dog and cat in it isn’t that sad and you know that the dog didn’t really die in real life, you’re a balling mess on the couch for two minutes while your BF looks at you wide-eyed, rubbing your back for comfort.

crying

At least I’m not pregnant!!”

No need to elaborate here.

not pregnant

Who says chocolate isn’t a breakfast

5 Last Minute Costumes You Can Make Using Cotton

Just like any other holiday, Halloween has a way of creeping up on you (no pun intended), but at least with every other holiday, you don’t have to assemble a clever and cute costume for every child in your house! If you’re like us and waited until the last minute, we’ve got several holiday costumes you can make using, you guessed it, the cotton balls right out of your medicine cabinet!

1. A Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing Baby

Grab a sweatsuit or onesie and start pinning or hot gluing like crazy. While that wolf hat below looks like someone spent some time on it, you don’t have to get as fancy. Cut some faux teeth, eyes, and ears out of felt and attach them to a brown beanie. Voila! Your child is the cutest little carnivore ever.
wolf-in-sheeps-clothing

2. Grandma Baby
It’s a race to see who is going to pinch whose cheek first! Dress your babe up

THIS is the cotton you need to be using…

That’s right. 12,000 tampons! Did you also know that the FDA doesn’t require companies to list the ingredients they put in tampons? Turns out there’s some not so nice things lurking around in there.

For example, some tampon brands contain manufactured chemical pulps and it’s as gross as it sounds. This includes things like rayon, viscose, and lyocell. Not only is this not friendly to your body, it’s also not environmentally friendly. Rayon and viscose are byproduct of trees, which take much longer to regenerate than the cotton plant.

Cotton contains less chemicals, produces less waste, is much more renewable, and the preferred choice of many consumers, but how do you know which tampons contain cotton?

Simply look for the Purified Cotton symbol.

purified-cotton-logo

 

 

 

When you see our symbol, you know that you’re getting 100% pure cotton that has been undergone the world’s most highly intensive proprietary

Understanding the Different Types of Adult Incontinence

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Even Lego People do the Pee Pee Dance.  These were the signs for the restrooms at Legoland in California.  Had to chuckle everytime we went in to one.

One of the first steps to understanding incontinence is realizing that, although it may feel like it, you aren’t the only person who suffers from incontinence. According to the National Association for Continence, over 25 million American experience some type of incontinence issue. Although the causes are varied, it’s best to identify the type of incontinence first because treatment methods will vary depending on the diagnosis.

Bladder Incontinence

This condition results in involuntary urine loss, and it is what people commonly think of when referring to incontinence issues. It is also known as urinary incontinence. While this will affect more women than men, nearly 1/3 of people between the ages of 30 and 70 have lost bladder control. There are three different types of bladder incontinence:

  • Urge Incontinence: Everyone is familiar with the “pee dance,” but when you can’t make it to the toilet in time is a reality many people