Agriculture

The Life Cycle of Cotton

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When you’re looking at a finished cotton product, whether it be a cotton ball or a tampon, you may not be aware of the lengthy journey it took to harvest, process, and finalize the material. So what steps are included in the life cycle of cotton?

 

  1. Growing + Harvesting
  2. Ginning
  3. Purification
  4. Finishing
  5. Nonwoven manufacturing + Final products
  6. Afterlife

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Growing + Harvesting

Early each spring, cotton is planted in the southern half of the United States from California to Virginia. After 10 days, the seed begins to emerge from the soil with some help from heat and water. The average growing season spans over 150-160 day period.

By late autumn,

The Truth About Organic Cotton

truth about organic cotton

Organic. We hear this word daily, if not several times a day. Once (and still) a trend in food products, the term organic is starting to gain significant meaning in everyday merchandise like baby wipes, hygiene products, etc. Occasionally, we may hear the term used in the labeling of cotton products.

What exactly is organic cotton?

According to the experts at Barnhardt Natural Fibers, all global certifying bodies would agree that the plant should start with a non-GMO seed and be grown with the use of organically approved pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers.

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What is the difference between organic and non-organic cotton?

Surprisingly, there is not much of a difference between organic and conventional cotton other than in the way that it is grown. However, because it takes more land to yield the same amount of

Why Buy American Cotton?

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The idea of “buying local” is no longer a trend. Consumers of all demographics realize the importance of supporting local businesses and the advantages it can have, especially when it comes to your diet. Slowly but surely, this idea is creeping into other forms of businesses, but let’s face it; Everything you need isn’t made in your hometown. At that point, it’s advantageous to look for American-made products and products made with Purified Cotton™ fit the label to a tee. Here are two BIG reasons you should consider buying cotton grown in the good ol’ US of A.

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American Grown Cotton is Sustainable

Every product in your home (and even its various pieces) must go through what is called a “supply chain.” According to Investopedia, “a supply chain is a network between a company and its suppliers to produce and distribute a