Recent News

Smart Consumers Are Rethinking Fast Fashion

SMART CONSUMER

The concept of ‘fast fashion’, a trend that surfaced almost 20 years ago, is one that we (both consumers and producers) should be paying more attention to.

Polyester has emerged as a leader in garment fabrics found in retail stores all over the world, used in almost 60% of new clothing found in stores. Polyester is relatively inexpensive and versatile, but not all that glitters is gold. There are some detrimental downsides to polyester that affect the environment, as well as the consumer:

  • There are approximately 21.3 million tons of polyester on retail shelves today, a 157% increase since 2000. That’s 42,600,000,000 pounds.
  • Producing enough fiber for a polyester t-shirt contributes more than twice the amount of CO2 than the equivalent amount of cotton.
  • Polyester decomposes at a much slower rate than cotton and other natural fibers.
  • Polyester retains more odors than cotton, which means it will need to be washed

Feminine Product Companies with a Mission

FEMININE PRODUCT COMPANIES (1)

What makes a feminine product company special?

The ingredients they use? Conscious packaging? An important mission?

What about all three?

We did some research and found three companies that provide both high-quality products and environmentally friendly packaging, while also giving back to other women in return.

 

The Honey Pot Company

HP_crest_logo-01_175x

The founder of The Honey Pot Company, Beatrice Dixon, created her first feminine wash out of necessity after suffering from bacterial vaginosis for 7 months. With no solution in sight, Dixon decided to take matters into her own hands, formulating a plant-based, coconut oil wash and testing it out for herself. After a few uses, her symptoms cleared and comfort followed. From there, she created her brand The Honey Pot Company; this empowering business offers pads,

An Aging Population Deserves Quality Cotton

old-person

In a report released by Persistent Market Research today, consumer demand for disposable medical supplies is expected to rise significantly by 2020. But just what are disposable medical supplies? Every time you go to the doctor or the dentist, certain products are used to conduct whatever tests you might need that day. A q-tip for a saliva sample, a dressing for a wound, and blood glucose test strips are all examples of disposable medical supplies. Other items include adult incontinence diapers and even the cotton balls used to wipe down your arm before you’re given a shot.

One of the reasons for the particularly high growth in this field is the aging Baby Boomer population. As more Americans enter their golden age, visits to the doctor increase, which places a higher demand on the products that are used the most. Did you know that Barnhardt’s Purified Cotton ™ is also placed in many health care products? Due to it’s

This Pop Up Shop Sells All Things Related to Periods

Walk into any shopping area and you’ll find niche stores everywhere. Need flip flops? There’s a store over there. Gotta have the newest phone accessory? Just walk across the street. But have you ever seen an entire store dedicated to period gear? Probably not. Until now. Learn more about the newest “Period Pop-Up Shop” below with a full breakdown written by Eva Recinos from psfk.

U by Kotex hosted a pop-up shop where women can feel safe and comfortable when it comes to discussing — and shopping for —their period. 

With conversations around legislation and women’s bodies, it’s become increasingly clear that periods are still a taboo topic for some.

For this reason, U by Kotex creates a space where women felt comfortable shopping not only for basic supplies but also items like mugs, sweatshirts and travel bags.

The Period Shop featured items from brands and makers like ban.do,

Health Scare Leads to New Zealand’s First Organic Tampon

Great international news from our friends at Stuff.co.nz!
Written by Abbie Napier; Photos by David Walker

NZ Tampon 1

Ana Ames-Durey started an organic tampon company to supply New Zealand women with a quality product.

Ana Ames-Durey was rushed into surgery having just signed a form giving doctors permission to remove both her ovaries.

At just 28-years-old, she was crippled with abdominal cramps and an ambulance had been called. Scans revealed two cysts, both about 7cm in diameter, were growing on her ovaries. One had twisted and split, leaking toxins into her body.

Fortunately, she survived the surgery with great strength and doctors were able to save her ovaries. It ended up being a life-changing experience.

Medical staff recommended she switch to organic tampons to reduce the stress on her system.

“Regular tampons are filled with chemicals, pesticides, fragrances, bleaches and dyes,” she says.

“That’s going

The Tampon Tax, Explained

courtesy of The Washington Post & Sarah Larimer

The so-called “tampon tax,” the issue Cristina Garcia now finds herself championing, isn’t one she just stumbled upon; the California assemblywoman said she has been thinking about this “gender injustice” for awhile.

“I think a lot of women have at some point, thought about it, you know?” Garcia said this week.

Last year, Garcia kicked around the idea of introducing legislation that would make feminine hygiene products exempt from sales taxes in America’s most populous state.

She didn’t pull the trigger just then. But at a meeting in October, she heard from women in her district, and they talked a lot about their daily struggles and “how it all adds up,” she said.

On average, according to Garcia’s office, women in California pay about $7 per month for 40 years of tampons and sanitary napkins. Statewide, it adds up “over $20 million annually in taxes,” according to

France Cuts Tampon Tax

bustle tampon

courtesy of Bustle & Emma Cueto

You would think the fact that tampons and other menstrual supplies are in fact necessities would be self-evident, but alas government tax policies often don’t treat them as such. However, in France they have at last cut the tampon tax. Just a few months after blocking the proposal, the French National Assembly has approved a measure to cut the VAT, or sales tax, on tampons from 20 percent to 5.5 percent. Finally!

The proposal to reduce taxes on menstrual supplies, which originally came from from feminist group Georgette Sand, was first shot down in October when the government said they couldn’t afford to pay for it. According to estimates, lowering the tax would cost the government the equivalent of about $60 million in 2016, which is quite a bit of money to lose from a budget. Of course, it’s also quite a bit of money

Mississippi Cotton Gin Finds a Way to Thrive

courtesy of AgWeb

Cotton growers are facing some difficult times. That’s when you factor in acreage and demand. But one Southern area seems to be the exception for business.

The majority of cotton is harvested near Macon, Mississippi. Grower Jack Huerkamp says this season was a challenge early on with too much rain and then too much heat.

“We had a real average year this year. Average is good. That’s not a bad thing,” said  Jack Huerkamp, president of the Bogue Chitto Gin. Harvest weather also turned out in his favor.

“We ended up with an excellent harvest season. We can’t beat that. We didn’t get but one small rain from the time we started picking till we finished picking. That’s what you want to do with cotton,” said Huerkamp.

Growers don’t have to travel far to gin their crop either. “This is the first cotton gin in this area since the last one

Cotton versus Polyester

from our friends at Cotton Farming.com

by Andrew Olah

Picture this. A future time, perhaps 10 years from today. It’s Christmas morning, and a young kid opens the Christmas gift his grandparents gave him.

He unpacks it quickly hoping he likes whatever is being given because he needs to look happy, and the best way to do that is to actually be happy. Unpacked, the gift he finds is a 100 percent polyester team jersey from his favorite professional basketball player. Perhaps it’s the jersey Lebron James’ son wears for the Boston Celtics. He holds it up to show the family and says, “Do you guys realize this is made from polyester and will never biodegrade? I mean never EVER EVER BIODEGRADE?”

“Oh?” his grandmother says, “The store said it was recycled polyester.” The kid rolls his eyes. “So it does last forever.”

In February 2015, CNN wrote, “Nearly every piece of plastic still