Tampons

A History of Menstrual Products

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Since the beginning of time women have had periods.

It can be difficult to imagine Joan of Arc getting her period during a battle or Sojourner Truth fashioning a pad from a rag, but these were the realities women have always had to face. Because of the long-standing stigma about vaginal health and menstruation, there isn’t much documentation about the history of periods until around the 20th century.  

A few ancient cultures forbade menstruating women from touching crops and food out of fear that their flow would spoil it. In some cases, women weren’t even allowed to touch their husbands until their cycle was evidently over. Periods were also closely associated with hysteria, superstition, and uncleanliness, so it’s easy to assume that there weren’t many historical writings done on the subject.

However, there is speculation

Consumer Spotlight: Corman

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Committed to their customer and to the environment, Corman is an Italian, family-owned company with a mission to “excellence in development and manufacturing of feminine hygiene and adult light incontinence products, covering specific niches of the market—hypoallergenic pads, tampons and panty liners, 100% cotton-based, natural, certified organic and biodegradable products.” Through clinical studies and research, Corman has developed products in all of those categories that offer complete protection for women and their sensitive skin.

 

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Why Cotton?

Corman believes in cotton for their products because of the unique fiber structure that creates a breathable and more comfortable surface versus artificial fibers or added chemicals, which often trap moisture and offer less ventilation than cotton containing components. The natural softness of cotton, combined with its hypoallergenic properties, creates a safe and neutral pH for the skin–especially for those with sensitive skin. The belief was further supported in a large clinical study.

Feminine Product Companies with a Mission

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What makes a feminine product company special?

The ingredients they use? Conscious packaging? An important mission?

What about all three?

We did some research and found three companies that provide both high-quality products and environmentally friendly packaging, while also giving back to other women in return.

 

The Honey Pot Company

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The founder of The Honey Pot Company, Beatrice Dixon, created her first feminine wash out of necessity after suffering from bacterial vaginosis for 7 months. With no solution in sight, Dixon decided to take matters into her own hands, formulating a plant-based, coconut oil wash and testing it out for herself. After a few uses, her symptoms cleared and comfort followed. From there, she created her brand The Honey Pot Company; this empowering business offers pads,

What’s Really in my Tampon?

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The weekly grocery trip. Or maybe daily for some of us. At one point or another, most women have to mark ‘tampons’ off that list. So how do you decide which box to buy?

Is budget important to you? Absorption? What about ingredients? What’s in my tampon, really?

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While some marketing campaigns might have you think that tampons are made out of pure clouds, the reality is far more concerning. If you’re buying any old box of tampons, chances are you may be putting some harmful ingredients into the most sensitive part of your body, like:

  • Rayon
    Used because of it’s highly absorbent nature, this semi-synthetic (read: man-made) material is one of the reasons TSS (toxic shock syndrome) is a concern. Although TSS cases peaked in the ‘80s and the most absorbent

What is a Natural Fiber?

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Last week we talked about synthetic fibers. We dove into the how they basically take plastic pellets and make them into material that then goes into your wipes, your pads, and other things that you wouldn’t think have any plastic in them. Today, we’re going to talk about natural fibers and why your body likes them much better.rsz_natural_fiber

A natural fiber will always come from a plant, animal, or mineral source. Cotton is an example of a plant sourced natural fiber, wool is an example of a natural fiber that comes from an animal, and asbestos is a mineral. Humans have been using natural fibers since civilization began to form, but in modern clothing, feminine hygiene, and beauty products, you’d be hard pressed to find any natural fiber. It’s worth it to take the time to find products containing 100% cotton though.

Want to know why?

  1. Cotton is Less Toxic

You already pay attention to the ingredients

10 Thoughts Every Woman Has on Her Period

Whether you’ve got your flow down to a science or it manages to sneak up on you each month, there are many thoughts that rattle through your brain from beginning to end. Of course every woman’s period and side effects are different. Some of us veg out, others exercise the cramps away, but you can guarantee that at least one of these thoughts has gone through your head while period-ing.

Why am I crying?”

Even though you know that commercial with the dog and cat in it isn’t that sad and you know that the dog didn’t really die in real life, you’re a balling mess on the couch for two minutes while your BF looks at you wide-eyed, rubbing your back for comfort.

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At least I’m not pregnant!!”

No need to elaborate here.

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Who says chocolate isn’t a breakfast

Want to Know What’s Really in Your Tampons?

When it comes to knowing what’s in your feminine care products, beauty products, and even your baby’s diapers, it can be hard to distinguish what’s good and what’s bad in the long lists of scientific, hard to pronounce ingredients. Here’s a helpful infographic to help you learn more about what’s really in your everyday products.

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Health Scare Leads to New Zealand’s First Organic Tampon

Great international news from our friends at Stuff.co.nz!
Written by Abbie Napier; Photos by David Walker

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Ana Ames-Durey started an organic tampon company to supply New Zealand women with a quality product.

Ana Ames-Durey was rushed into surgery having just signed a form giving doctors permission to remove both her ovaries.

At just 28-years-old, she was crippled with abdominal cramps and an ambulance had been called. Scans revealed two cysts, both about 7cm in diameter, were growing on her ovaries. One had twisted and split, leaking toxins into her body.

Fortunately, she survived the surgery with great strength and doctors were able to save her ovaries. It ended up being a life-changing experience.

Medical staff recommended she switch to organic tampons to reduce the stress on her system.

“Regular tampons are filled with chemicals, pesticides, fragrances, bleaches and dyes,” she says.

“That’s going

The Tampon Tax, Explained

courtesy of The Washington Post & Sarah Larimer

The so-called “tampon tax,” the issue Cristina Garcia now finds herself championing, isn’t one she just stumbled upon; the California assemblywoman said she has been thinking about this “gender injustice” for awhile.

“I think a lot of women have at some point, thought about it, you know?” Garcia said this week.

Last year, Garcia kicked around the idea of introducing legislation that would make feminine hygiene products exempt from sales taxes in America’s most populous state.

She didn’t pull the trigger just then. But at a meeting in October, she heard from women in her district, and they talked a lot about their daily struggles and “how it all adds up,” she said.

On average, according to Garcia’s office, women in California pay about $7 per month for 40 years of tampons and sanitary napkins. Statewide, it adds up “over $20 million annually in taxes,” according to

France Cuts Tampon Tax

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courtesy of Bustle & Emma Cueto

You would think the fact that tampons and other menstrual supplies are in fact necessities would be self-evident, but alas government tax policies often don’t treat them as such. However, in France they have at last cut the tampon tax. Just a few months after blocking the proposal, the French National Assembly has approved a measure to cut the VAT, or sales tax, on tampons from 20 percent to 5.5 percent. Finally!

The proposal to reduce taxes on menstrual supplies, which originally came from from feminist group Georgette Sand, was first shot down in October when the government said they couldn’t afford to pay for it. According to estimates, lowering the tax would cost the government the equivalent of about $60 million in 2016, which is quite a bit of money to lose from a budget. Of course, it’s also quite a bit of money